About the Hazel

Another native species, Hazel’s role in Irish history goes back quite some distance – beginning as a source of food and timber for early human settlers.

The plant is widespread in woodland areas throughout the country and can often be found interspersed and under the canopy of other oak and ash woods or as part of true Hazel woods in its own right.

A shrub rather than a tree, it grows to a height of about 5 metres and will re-grow again, even if cut right back to its stump. The Hazelnut is a good source of protein and its thought to keep away lumbago and rheumatism.

The plant’s leaves are wrinkled, about 10 cm long and are oval even round in shape. Practical uses for its timber include fences, fuel, hurdles and barrel hoops, before they were replaced with metal bands. Found at various locations around the Park.

Donate online and help make the Asian Sanctuary at Fota Wildlife Park a reality!

Please support our Asian Sanctuary Fund by Donating online

The impetus for the development of the Asia Sanctuary is to enhance the Wildlife Park to become an iconic international visitor attraction.

The concept of the development will be in line with the existing unique open nature of the Wildlife Park but will be designed to give this new development an authentic Asian ambiance.

Phase 1: Asian Forestry June 2014

75.01%

So far we've raised

1,500,160

Help us reach our target

Phase 2: Asian Wetlands June 2015

0.01%

So far we've raised

210

Help us reach our target

Phase 3: Asian Plains June 2016

0.01%

So far we've raised

215

Help us reach our target